① Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation

Thursday, December 23, 2021 12:54:51 AM

Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation



They ensure the bright lights of sarajevo services are provided in settings accessible and acceptable Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation mental health problems. If you Social Media Sociology a Kindred employee and have questions about your benefits, Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation visit www. How does ultrasound work? People from black, Asian and Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation minority Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation groups advise Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation what local health and wellbeing programmes should focus on and what culturally sensitive and acceptable services should look Charles Charles: A Character Analysis Of Charles. Numerator — the number in the denominator who completed Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation intensive lifestyle change Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation. But the goals in Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation ICU Benefits Of Acute Rehabilitation which include achieving medical stability and preventing a go ask alice book crisis — are different from the goals of the inpatient rehabilitation team.

Inpatient Acute Rehabilitation

Inpatient rehabilitation is for patients who have a traumatic brain injury that prevents them from returning home after their hospital stay usually in an intensive care unit. But the goals in the ICU — which include achieving medical stability and preventing a medical crisis — are different from the goals of the inpatient rehabilitation team. There are four common issues that an inpatient rehabilitation team addresses when treating someone who has suffered a brain injury: thinking, physical, sensory and emotional. The specific therapies in an inpatient rehab facility for those suffering from brain injuries varies from patient to patient. Most patients will receive at least three hours of therapy per day, five to seven days a week.

The patient will likely see a physician at least three times per week while the rehabilitation team will consist of a highly-trained team of practitioners including a rehabilitation nurse, physical and occupational therapists, a social worker, a speech-language pathologist, and others. Data source: Local health data collection, for example mental health and wellbeing joint strategic needs assessment profile.

Service providers primary care services, community care services and services in the wider public, community and voluntary sectors ensure that the services they provide recognise the beliefs, expectations and values of local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups. They continually review the services to ensure that they are culturally appropriate, accessible and tailored to the diverse needs of the local population. Health, public health and social care practitioners recognise the beliefs, expectations and values of local people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups that they support. They ensure that the services they provide are culturally appropriate and accessible. This may mean working in partnership with existing local community groups or faith leaders who can support delivering some of the programmes in non-traditional community-based settings.

Commissioners Public Health England, NHS England, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups gather intelligence and gain understanding of the diversity of the local population and its needs. They ensure that the views of people from minority ethnic groups are represented when priorities are set and local health and wellbeing programmes are designed.

This may be through engaging local communities using public consultation or community workshops that discuss future services. These can ensure that the local population is represented by individuals as well as established community groups and educational or religious leaders. The commissioners also ensure that local services have the skills mix and capacity to provide support that is culturally appropriate and tailored to the needs of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups to make positive behaviour changes. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups advise on what local health and wellbeing programmes should focus on and what culturally sensitive and acceptable services should look like.

They share their views during workshops or consultations organised by the commissioners, or through other people who they trust, such as community leaders or faith leaders. Health and wellbeing programmes cover all strategies, initiatives, services, activities, projects or research that aim to improve health physical and mental and wellbeing and reduce health inequalities. Due to language and communication difficulties or past experiences of racism and prejudice, some people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups may not have had a positive experience of accessing services. This may prevent them from engaging with services and increase their risk of poor health outcomes.

Commissioners and providers seeking to obtain the views and understand the needs of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups should work closely with existing community groups, faith leaders and educators who may already have links to groups and individuals with poor access to services. Peer and lay roles This quality statement is taken from the promoting health and preventing premature mortality in black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups quality standard.

People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups are represented in peer and lay roles within local health and wellbeing programmes. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups are underrepresented in health and wellbeing programmes. To ensure that the programmes are accessed and used by minority ethnic groups, commissioners and providers need to recognise the knowledge, skills and expertise of local communities. People known to and trusted by communities can take on peer and lay roles and encourage uptake of services among groups that may otherwise be reluctant to get involved. They can raise awareness, deliver information and advice in a culturally appropriate manner, and help with designing and providing interventions and services that are relevant, acceptable and tailored to the local population.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, from service planning and service design records, and recruitment records. Data source: Local data collection, for example, records of meetings, mentoring sessions, existing support networks or workshops with people taking on peer and lay roles. Proportion of local health and wellbeing programmes with people working in peer and lay roles who are representative of the local community. Numerator — the number in the denominator with people working in peer and lay roles who are representative of the local community. Data source: Local data collection, for example, from service annual reports.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, review of service records. Service providers primary care services, community care services and services in the wider public, community and voluntary sectors ensure that they work with established community groups and educational or religious leaders to identify and recruit members of the local community who can support people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups and represent the diverse needs of the local population.

They ensure that people in lay roles are supported with resources, information and mechanisms to proactively engage members of the community who may be excluded or disengaged. Service providers also support people in peer and lay roles with feedback, support networks, training and mentoring to allow them to fulfil their responsibilities, reach their full potential and continue with the role. Commissioners community and voluntary sector organisations and statutory services understand the diversity of their local community and make a long-term commitment to funding and supporting effective community engagement approaches, such as peer and lay roles.

They secure resources to recruit people to peer and lay roles and provide them with ongoing training and support. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups are given support and information by other members of their own community who are working closely with organisations that provide local health and wellbeing services. These people represent the interests and concerns of the community and ensure that local health and wellbeing programmes and services recognise the beliefs, expectations and values of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups.

Community engagement: improving health and wellbeing and reducing health inequalities NICE guideline NG44, recommendation 1. Community members working in a non-professional capacity to support health and wellbeing initiatives. Peer and lay roles may be paid or unpaid that is, voluntary. Effective peer and lay approaches are:. Due to language and communication difficulties or past experiences of racism and prejudice, some people from the black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups may not have had a positive experience of accessing services. People in peer and lay roles may be more successful at engaging with and supporting people from similar backgrounds than traditional health and wellbeing services.

Referring people at high risk of type 2 diabetes This quality statement is taken from the promoting health and preventing premature mortality in black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups quality standard. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups at high risk of type 2 diabetes are referred to an intensive lifestyle change programme. People from certain ethnic communities have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than those in the white European population.

In these populations, the risk of type 2 diabetes increases at an earlier age and at a lower BMI level. Many cases of type 2 diabetes are preventable through changes to a person's diet and physical activity levels. Evidence-based intensive lifestyle change programmes can significantly reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes for those at high risk. Evidence of local arrangements for identifying and referring people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups at high risk of type 2 diabetes.

Numerator — the number in the denominator who are referred to an intensive lifestyle change programme. Denominator — the number of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups who are identified as being at high risk of type 2 diabetes. Numerator — the number in the denominator who attended an intensive lifestyle change programme. Denominator — the number of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups who are at high risk of type 2 diabetes referred to an intensive lifestyle change programme. Numerator — the number in the denominator who completed an intensive lifestyle change programme.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, GP patient records. Service providers such as GPs and community healthcare providers ensure that people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups who are identified as being at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes are referred to an intensive lifestyle change programme. They also ensure that systems are in place to start diabetes prevention interventions at a lower BMI threshold in people from minority ethnic groups at increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

This may involve people in peer and lay roles raising awareness, assessing risks and providing advice on diabetes prevention among those ethnic minorities. Health and public health practitioners such as GPs, practice nurses and community healthcare providers are aware that some black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes.

They refer people who are at high risk to an intensive lifestyle change programme and provide advice to those with a lower level of risk. Commissioners clinical commissioning groups, NHS England and local authorities in sustainability and transformation partnership areas ensure that intensive lifestyle change programmes are available for people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups at high risk of type 2 diabetes. They work with ethnic minorities to ensure that programmes include a range of culturally sensitive and appropriate behaviour change interventions. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic group at high risk of type 2 diabetes are referred to culturally sensitive and appropriate services that can help them achieve healthy weight and be more active.

Those who are not currently at high risk of type 2 diabetes are given information and further support relevant to their needs. A structured and coordinated range of interventions provided in different venues for people identified as being at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It should be local, evidence-based and quality-assured. The aim is to help people to become more physically active and improve their diet. If the person is overweight or obese, the programme should result in weight loss. Programmes may be delivered to individuals or groups or involve a mix of both depending on the resources available. They can be provided by primary care teams and public, private or community organisations with expertise in dietary advice, weight management and physical activity.

High risk is defined as a fasting plasma glucose level of 5. These terms are used instead of specific numerical scores because risk assessment tools have different scoring systems. Examples of risk assessment tools include: Diabetes risk score assessment tool , QDiabetes risk calculator and Leicester practice risk score. Due to language and communication difficulties, or past experiences of racism and prejudice, some people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups may find it difficult to engage with services. Intensive lifestyle change programmes need to be culturally appropriate, accessible and tailored to the diverse needs of the local population.

Cardiac rehabilitation This quality statement is taken from the promoting health and preventing premature mortality in black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups quality standard. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups referred to a cardiac rehabilitation programme are given a choice of times and settings for the sessions and are followed up if they do not attend.

Cardiac rehabilitation programmes improve clinical outcomes for people who have had a cardiac event. However, uptake among people from black, Asian and other ethnic minority groups is lower than in the general population. Providing programmes that are culturally appropriate and sensitive, at settings and times that are convenient can increase uptake. Following up people who do not attend allows for a discussion about potential barriers to attendance and how to overcome them. It also gives the opportunity to motivate people to start or to continue with the programme.

Data source: Local data collection, for example, from service level agreements. Numerator — the number in the denominator offered sessions in a variety of settings including home, the community or a hospital. Denominator — the number of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups referred to a cardiac rehabilitation programme. Data source: Local data collection, for example, from patient records. Denominator — the number of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups referred to a cardiac rehabilitation programme who did not start the programme. Denominator — the number of people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups participating in a cardiac rehabilitation programme who missed their appointment.

Local data collection, for example, from cardiac rehabilitation programme data collection system. Data source: Local data collection, for example, surveys carried out with people referred to cardiac rehabilitation. Service providers secondary and tertiary care services ensure they provide individualised support for people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups to attend and continue with cardiac rehabilitation programmes. This may include working on overcoming barriers with people who are not willing to engage with services due to poor past experiences or ensuring that the programmes are run on different days, at different times and at venues that are culturally appropriate and convenient.

Providers also ensure that a varied range of acceptable and culturally sensitive exercise is available, and people are followed up to continue with the programme. Healthcare professionals such as cardiologists and cardiac nurses identify barriers to attending a cardiac rehabilitation programme and offer individualised support to people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups. They offer cardiac rehabilitation programmes on different days, at different times and venues such as community centres or places of worship and ensure that they are culturally appropriate and suitable. Healthcare professionals also follow-up people to motivate them to continue with the programme or understand the obstacles that may prevent people from using the service.

Commissioners clinical commissioning groups commission cardiac rehabilitation services that have the capacity and expertise to provide people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups with programmes that are suitable, acceptable and culturally appropriate. They also ensure that the services support people from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups to attend and adhere to the programme by addressing the barriers to participation. People from black, Asian and other minority ethnic groups referred to a cardiac rehabilitation programme are supported to attend and keep going to the sessions. This might mean that sessions are available at venues and times convenient to the person or that the sessions are acceptable to them culturally, for example, single sex or with bilingual staff.

A coordinated and structured programme designed to remove or reduce the underlying causes of cardiovascular disease, as well as to provide the best possible physical, mental and social conditions, so that people can, by their own efforts, continue to play a full part in their community and through improved health behaviour, slow or reverse progression of the disease. Ultrasonic waves or sound waves of a high frequency that is not audible to the human ear are produced by means of mechanical vibration in the metal treatment head of the ultrasound machine.

The treatment head is then moved over the surface of the skin in the region of the injury transmitting the energy into the tissues. When sound waves come into contact with air it causes a dissipation of the waves, and so a special ultrasound gel is placed on the skin to ensure maximal contact between the treatment head and the surface of the skin and to provide a medium through with the sound waves can travel. Ultrasound can also be applied underwater which is also a medium for ultrasound waves to travel through.

The effects of therapeutic ultrasound are still being disputed. To date, there is still very little evidence to explain how ultrasound causes a therapeutic effect in injured tissue. Nevertheless, practitioners worldwide continue to use this treatment modality relying on personal experience rather than scientific evidence. Below are a number of the theories by which ultrasound is proposed to cause a therapeutic effect. As the ultrasound waves pass from the treatment head into the skin they cause the vibration of the surrounding tissues, particularly those that contain collagen.

This increased vibration leads to the production of heat within the tissue. In most cases, this cannot be felt by the patient themselves. This increase in temperature may cause an increase in the extensibility of structures such as ligaments, tendons, scar tissue, and fibrous joint capsules. In addition, heating may also help to reduce pain and muscle spasm and promote the healing process.

One of the greatest proposed benefits of ultrasound therapy is that it is thought to reduce the healing time of certain soft tissue injuries. Ultrasound is thought to accelerate the normal resolution time of the inflammatory process by attracting more mast cells to the site of injury. This may cause an increase in blood flow which can be beneficial in the sub-acute phase of tissue injury. As blood flow may be increased it is not advised to use ultrasound immediately after injury. Ultrasound may also stimulate the production of more collagen which is the main protein component in soft tissue such as tendons and ligaments.

Hence ultrasound may accelerate the proliferative phase of tissue healing. It is thought to improve the extensibility of mature collagen and so can have a positive effect on fibrous scar tissue which may form after an injury. Ultrasound is normally applied by use of a small metal treatment head which emits the ultrasonic beam. This is moved continuously over the skin for approximately mins. Treatments may be repeated times daily in more acute injuries and less frequently in chronic cases. Ultrasound dosage can be varied either in intensity or frequency of the ultrasound beam. Simply speaking lower frequency application provides a greater depth of penetration and so is used in cases where the injured tissue is suspected to be deeply situated.

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